Local Singaporeans publications I still pay attention to and why

I grew up in an increasingly digital world. I really would not wait for one month for something that is only relevant for a while. But I am still someone who appreciates the feel of a physical book. I just think that growing up as I did, and still liking prints, made me have a different mindset compared to the generation before me. I don’t like to wait for a month for a news or update that is only relevant or keeps changing in matter of days, but I do enjoy the physicality of reading a book that took a year or three to make, and a magazine that speak more ideas than trends and advertising.

The internet is for speed and discussion and connectivity with others, while the print signifies a long progress, and a cristallisation of ideas, and a moment with myself, which I will cherish and keep on my shelf. For me, who is used to getting free content from the internet, buys print as a sign of appreciation and support through the money I gave to the creators.

These are the local magazines I pay attention to, and engage with online through their social media as well as meet-up, panel discussions, pop-up events offline.

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S A N D M A G A Z I N E

SAND magazine is an independent magazine that highlighted the creators and creatives. Although this magazine was made with collaborators but the force behind this magazine is essentially one girl, Racy LIm, which made me fell even harder for SAND Magazine. There are currently two prints available, the sustainability and the creativity issue. I have read and loved both issues. Reading this magazine is cool because it was a compilation of the things I like to read about local creative scene. I discovered new local businesses which I like. I also really like looking at layouts and editorials in magazine so every page was a treat to me. I think, on a deeper level, I care about this magazine because I want to create something similar to SAND Magazine.

This publication can be bought in BooksActually at Tiong Bahru.

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A L E S C E M A G A Z I N E

Alesce is a quarterly publication with creative shoots and narratives surrounding what it means to be a Christian in this modern world.

I went to the launch of the first issue : origins. The magazine was divided to four parts : heart, mind, body and soul. The pieces were thoughtful and introspective which are the type of content and writing I always soft spot for. I had never read a so called publication that framed faith so contemporary and artistic and still personal and religious before.

Not only the team created this publication with the focus of content, they also had a mission to create an engaging Christian women community. By coming to the launch, I was introduced to a new publication, small and local creative businesses, as well as unknowingly welcomed in such community. It was very special that the conversation in the magazine continued in real life with every event they held or even their online presence.

Alesce’s first issue can be found in Wild Oliva Branch (Suntec)

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T H E I D E O L O G Y M A G A Z I N E

The Ideology is a local independent publication about politics, philosophy and art. It opens up discussion and scrutinising about capitalism, solidarity in an individual world, identity and also loneliness. Not going to lie, I was first drawn to the magazine because I resonate to the art style of the publication, but I met and heard and read what the creator of the magazine, Evelyn Yeo, talk about the idea of the publication, and how different it is to any other publication I read threw me off at first, but then I learnt to read it as the inside of a girl’s mind, and a girl’s persuasion and argument for me to think about, not swallow raw. The ideology is one woman magazine, from the writing, the illustrations and layout. Evelyn takes about a year to complete an issue. I have a huge respect for anyone who tries to devote herself to a project from start to finish but also create a platform to voice her opinion and what she thinks is important even when it’s not mainstream. I think it’s brave and inspiring.

There are three issues to date. They can be bought at BooksActually.

 
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F E M A L E M A G A Z I N E

As a fashion business student, I need to keep up with the local fashion and societal trend. Time and again, I find that FEMALE magazine is a good place to find what is trending in fashion industry, from finding local designers, rising gate keepers or happenings, the platform delivered. I like that they differentiate the online and print content strategically. I am not going to lie though, their print issue has too many advertising for my liking, but, that is the way magazine keeps their wheels turning, and so I can stand perusing the ads after ads, to find delight in finding new-to-me creatives in fashion such as Stefan Khoo and Shawn Paul Tan. I still buy the issue although I come back their online content more often, because I want them to know I appreciate what they are doing, the magazine and the people behind it. This is the only fashion publication I still buy prints off, because I feel strongly about a lot of the people highlighted and involved in this particular magazine.

Hanna Bella